Tripods on the Edge

I seem to be on a tripod kick lately.  I’ll continue that theme with what I hope will be a fun exercise with lots of involvement from you, my loyal blog readers.  The other night, while my tripod and I were perched in a precarious position about 40′ off the deck and literally on the edge of a cliff, I got to thinking about all the crazy places my poor old Gitzo has been set up.  I took a photo of it living la vida loca and am including it here for your amusement.  I’m also including the photo I made while teetering on the brink.  Was it worth the risk?  You betcha!

Here’s where the real fun begins.  Let’s see a photo of you and/or your tripod in a hairy situation.  Maybe it’s the edge of a cliff or waist deep in pounding surf.  Whatever, wherever – let’s see it!  You’ll have to post a link to the photo somewhere since you can’t upload photos directly in the response fields.  That would be cool, though.  Be sure to give us a little description, too!

12 thoughts on “Tripods on the Edge”

  1. Actually for this shot I had to place my tripod inside the water and my feet as well, that would be cool in a summer sunny day, not cool on a early spring cold day with lots of splashing.
    Tripod was a bit shaking when big waves hit the rocks so I decided to get the shot with my tripod strap over my neck to be sure nothing would be flowing while messing around with the filters and the adjustments.
    Got to time a bit the waves to get a shot not shaken (although the tripod was holding quite well), but my shoes where definitely wet and not that fun when I had to ride around 60Km’s with my motorcycle to get back home.
    Tripod…Benro C169 with a Vanguard SBH-300

      1. Thanks for havin’ a little fun with us, Kostas. This photo is gorgeous and well worth the effort to get it, even that chilly motorcycle ride back home! It’s hard for me to feel sorry for you knowing you’re riding a killer GS and living in Greece, though. ;-)

  2. Great idea Bret. The most precarious tripod placement I’ve had recently was in Channel Islands Nat’l Park. Two legs over the edge of the cliff, and a 40mph headwind pounding me as I tried taking photographs. I really envisioned my whole rig tumbling 700 feet into the Pacific that night. Fortunately, I had a trusty assistant to act as an anchor:

    http://www.alpenglowimagesphotography.com/blog/2010/04/anacapa-island-channel-islands-national-park/

    You can see the resultant photo here (I’d say it was worth it):

    http://www.alpenglowimagesphotography.com/landscapes/channel_islands/anacapa_island_inspiration_point2.jpg

  3. Yowza, Greg! That’s a freakin’ amazing seascape! Do you rent out your assistant? Wait a minute, that didn’t sound right. At any rate, thanks for sharing the photos and story. Seems we photographers will go to almost any length to make killer photos.

  4. Alas, I don’t have a photo of it readily available as it is tucked away in my film archives. Just outside of the western entrance to Algonquin Park in Ontario is a waterfall. One year, during the spring flood, I thought it would be great to do some time exposures at the base of the falls in flood as the sunset behind it.

    Had to slide 20 feet along a 4″ rock ledge beside the rapids to get to the base of the falls and then back again while carrying equipment and tripod on my back. In hindsight I think I must have been out of my mind. Shots were great though.

    1. Too bad you don’t have a photo as this sounds like a really precarious position to find yourself and your tripod in, David! If you ever round up a photo from that night please post a link to it. Would love to see it!

  5. Back in February I went down to Niagara Falls for some sunrise shots. A couple days before I went during the day and i didnt use my tripod. As I walked to the railing i thought “How am i going to get a shot with this railing in the way?” In the Falls during the winter the railing is FULL of ice, that added another dilemma. After many tries to figure out my composition, i finally found the perfect way.
    http://photographybydani.net/IMAG0880.jpg and http://photographybydani.net/IMAG0881.jpg
    who needs 3 tripod legs when you have a center column! hah!

    Here is the photo that came of it.
    http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2010/085/8/8/8838481831aae89266217cabfee633df.jpg

    This was a neat idea Bret. Thanx for letting me share!

  6. Hey Bret.

    Here’s my contribution to the topic. Sorry I didn’t get a shot of the tripod set up, but I was alone and it was hard enough getting up there once without trying it a few more times.
    Here’s the shot I got… http://sggphoto.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/chapel-falls-3-blog-052910-11.jpg and here’s where I got it from… http://sggphoto.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/chapel-falls-5-blog-052910-11.jpg Imagine one tripod leg in a tree cavity and one on each of the two rocks on the right side. I was balanced on the pointy rock near the tree, one hand on the tripod and one on the tree. I hope my wife doesn’t see this. :-) Of course, my water shoes showed up after I got home from this shoot.

    1. I had to stare at that photo for a long time before I finally figured out where you and your tripod were. That’s some serious talent! I’m glad you persisted though because the resultant photo was well worth the effort. The swirls at the bottom are crazy cool. Good stuff!

  7. I have used a tripod underwater while trying to get an octopus pic. I knew I would have to wait till the octopus decided to come out or it liked what was on the menu. So I brought the tripod so I would not have to constantly hold the camera. Used some dive weights to weigh it down. Never did get the pic though:) good experiment

    1. Wow…can’t say I’ve ever heard of someone using a tripod completely submerged underwater. Creative! Too bad the darn octopus didn’t wanna play nice, though. Thanks for the comment, Scott!

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