What Should I Write About?

I like to think that I’m a pretty creative guy.  I’m a photographer and although I don’t consider myself a “writer”, I do write.  Creativity is part of the equation for any artistic endeavor and as you all probably know, artists occasionally have mental blocks.

You may have noticed that I haven’t been as active on my blog over the last few weeks.  That’s partially due to time constraints but more a result of a mental block that is stifling my creativity with respect to writing.  Basically, I feel like I’m running out of ideas.

I love the blog and more than anything I enjoy the interactions with all of you.  I’ve got a few articles I’m working on but I’d like to build a reserve of topics that I can fall back on when writer’s block strikes.  So, I’m asking you for some help.

Here’s what I’ve got up my sleeve now: a gear review of the Acratech Leveling Head, a depth of field experiment/explanation, resources for planning a photo trip and making the most of an almost lost opportunity, fun with fisheyes (fisheye lens, not actual fish eyeballs – that’s nasty!).  That’s just about it.  So sad…

Here’s where I beg for your help.  I would be super appreciative to any and all who leave a comment or two suggesting some topics related to photography that I might write about.  Got a question for the experts?  Leave a comment.  Got an idea for an article?  Leave a comment.  Want to buy an expensive lens and send it to me to test so I can write a gear review?  I love you and will send you my shipping address.  Seriously though, I’m open to hearing all legitimate ideas.  Sooooooo…the gates are open.  Have at it!

9 thoughts on “What Should I Write About?”

  1. Speaking for myself, Bret, I always like reading about the photographer’s own experience, thoughts, and relationship with their subject matter. Anyone can do a gear review but only you can express why you do what you do.

    Guy

  2. Hey Bret!

    While you are writing about planning resources why don’t you write a separate set of articles that describes what you do to plan for a trip. After shooting with several other photographers I find it amazing how each individual photographer plans their trip. All of them so far different. Also while you can write just one article on planning resources I think that would still leave something to be desired…. For example TPE could make one article by itself.

    Hope this helps. :)

  3. Since I consider you an advanced photographer, would love to a read a few articles of yours relating to composition and vision in the field!
    I believe that’s the most daunting task for most photographers, either amateur, intermediate or even more advanced!
    Would be fascinating how the most pro’s approach this subject of photography and how they found answers to the ever going “how do I compose this one better” question! :)

  4. Well, I don’t have any great new gear for you to test but if you wanted to send that 15mm over I’m headed for Yellowstone and the Tetons 2 weeks from tomorrow. (nudge nudge wink wink)

    Seriously, I think everyone that writes a newsletter or blog goes through dry spells. I’m fortunate that while my blog mostly deals with photo stuff it’s not solely dedicated to that subject. If I want to rant about something I can. Some of my favorite blog posts detail me either observing or participating in Stupid Human Tricks. But enough rambling…

    What I’d like to see out there is marketing info. You, like a lot of us work a full time job to pay to for your photo addiction yet you appear to be very successful in marketing your images and workshops. Those are the areas I’d be interested in seeing more information. How do you do it?

  5. I might echo Kostas’ comments. There’s a lot of very useful stuff out there for beginning to low-intermediate photographers, but not so much for advanced intermediates and up (of course I realize that that stuff is harder to write). Personally, I eat up articles and posts about composition and creative process (trip planning would be a part of that). I don’t have a lot of budget for following the recommendations in gear reviews (though the Oboz shoes are sweet, thanks!), but there’s always room to work on composition.

    Also, don’t underestimate the value of posts on where you’ve been and what you’re shooting. I always like pretty pictures and pics of current conditions around the West, and a shot needn’t be portfolio-quality to be fun and interesting. Plus, even we Internet acquaintances enjoy just knowing that you’re well and what you’re up to.

  6. Can understand the “writer’s block”. Consider “going back to the basics” for a series of articles aimed at helping us to improve our fine art photography skills: Elements of Composition; Getting objects in sharp focus…macro; fast action; landscapes; Printing the fine art print; Selecting and preparing images for exhibitions and competitions.

    All of the great teams go back to the basics for pre-season training. Might be another series: Fall foliage; Spring/Wild flowers; Landscapes…

    Bill Brennan

  7. Thank you, thank you, thank you! These are all excellent ideas. I will refer back to these suggestions and will be posting some new stuff soon. I think I’ll probably start with Joe’s idea as that’s an easy one for me. :-)

  8. What Guy said – I’d love to hear about your personal relationship with your subject matter! :) I’ll also echo Jim’s comment, it would be interesting to hear how your plan your trips and what gear you take with you. I like to hike light and it’s taken me a while to come up with a lightweight kit that is adaptable for different subjects, so it would be nice to hear how the pros solve the issue or if you just take with you all your gear and a mule to carry it. :D

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